smithsonian:

Who Has the Best Facial Hair in Baseball History? Our friends at smithsonianmag always ask the important questions. 

smithsonian:

Who Has the Best Facial Hair in Baseball History? Our friends at smithsonianmag always ask the important questions. 

In 1921, roughly 10,000 coal miners fed up with unfair labor practices and exploitation took up arms against their employers. The resulting conflict lasted five days and has been called the biggest armed uprising on U.S. soil since the Civil War. It came to be known as the Battle of Blair Mountain.

In the 1600s, France had a problem. Both it and England were trying to build colonies in the Americas, and from population standpoint, England was way ahead, with its number of colonists in the low six figures. France, on the other hand, had only about 3,000 settlers in New France, thanks to a rather utilitarian view of women and children as inessential to a fur trapper’s bottom line. Louis XIV’s solution to this problem: shipping eligible ladies across the Atlantic to find husbands and start having babies.

We’re not blind to the many other issues that came about as a consequence of European colonization of the Americas (you’ll hear me mesh “colonization” and “colonialism” into one novel non-word) but today’s story is really about who these women were, how they got to New France and what happened to them after they arrived.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

oupacademic:

Fighting talk: how Tommies found a common language in the trenches: First world war soldiers would fight side by side but often not share a language – so they invented their own. 

oupacademic:

Fighting talk: how Tommies found a common language in the trenches: First world war soldiers would fight side by side but often not share a language – so they invented their own. 

Sawbones is a show about medical history. It’s for fun. Sometimes it’s also for giving me ideas for podcast subjects, which is what happened with today’s episode. After listening to the Sawbones episode Corpse Theft and the Resurrection Men while on a plane, I decided we needed an entire episode just on the Doctors’ Riot of 1788. That’s when a giant mob of people got so angry that buried bodies were being dug up for dissection that they stormed two different sites of medical study in New York. This was just one of at least 17 so-called anatomy riots in the U.S. between 1765 and 1854.

Here’s a link to our notes and research. We also hook you up with two places to learn whether England and France were at war in a given year. Since these are also for fun, please no pedantry about whether “England” or “France” is really the right name.

Today’s episode: 10,000+ years of cosmetics history (in brief). Here’s a link to our notes and research.

ourpresidents:

Barkers for Britain Tag 

Before America entered World War II, Fala served as president of Barkers for Britain, a nationwide effort by American dog lovers to support nonmilitary aid to Britain. Membership in the club helped support Bundles for Britain, an organization that collected cash contributions and donations of clothing, blankets, and other basic necessities for the British people. The organization presented membership tags like this one to dog owners who contributed to British war relief.

As president of Barkers for Britain, Fala received letters from around the nation, including this note (with photograph) from “Cire Noir Butler,” head of the group’s Austin, Texas, branch.

-from the Roosevelt Library 

Fala makes an appearance in our archival episode on historical pooches, from the Katie and Candace era.

(via retrocampaigns)

todayinhistory:

July 11th 1960: To Kill a Mockingbird published

On this day in 1960, the novel ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ by Harper Lee was published by J.B Lippincott & Co. The novel tells the story of the trial of a young African-American man in Alabama in the 1930s, and is told from the perspective of the daughter of the defendant’s lawyer, Scout Finch. Lee was partly inspired by events she recalled from her own childhood growing up in Alabama in the days of Jim Crow segregation. ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ was released during a turbulent time for American race relations, as the burgeoning Civil Rights Movement was beginning to get underway with sit-ins and Freedom Rides in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling Brown v. Board of Education (1954). The novel was originally going to be called ‘Atticus’ for Scout’s father and the moral centre of the story, but was renamed for one of Atticus’s iconic lines. The novel was an immediate success, and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1961. In 1962 it was adapted into an Oscar-winning film starring Gregory Peck and featuring the film debut of Robert Duvall as the elusive Boo Radley. Harper Lee never published another novel and remains reclusive from the press, though she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2007. The influence of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ has never faded in the 54 years since its release, and is a favourite of many for its warmth and humour while tackling some of the most troubling issues of its day.

"Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird"

Today in 1804: the duel between then-Vice President Aaron Burr and former Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton. Here’s our episode from the archive.

And for your reading pleasure: How Duels Work

ourpresidents:

For your summer BBQs - Ernest Hemingway’s burger recipe—
Pictured: Hemingway’s favorite burger recipe, with Mary Hemingway’s special instructions scribbled in the margins. (Credit: Ernest Hemingway Papers Collection, Museum Ernest Hemingway, Finca Vigia)Learn more about the documents here: http://www.jfklibrary.org/About-Us/News-and-Press/Press-Releases/2014-Hemingway-Cuba-Documents.aspx
-from the JFK Library 

ourpresidents:

For your summer BBQs - Ernest Hemingway’s burger recipe—

Pictured: Hemingway’s favorite burger recipe, with Mary Hemingway’s special instructions scribbled in the margins. (Credit: Ernest Hemingway Papers Collection, Museum Ernest Hemingway, Finca Vigia)

Learn more about the documents here: http://www.jfklibrary.org/About-Us/News-and-Press/Press-Releases/2014-Hemingway-Cuba-Documents.aspx

-from the JFK Library