When Christina of Sweden was born, her parents had been trying to have a male heir for more than five years. During that time, the Queen Consort had given birth to two stillborn babies, and the couple had also lost an infant daughter. So it may have been wishful thinking that led the midwives to joyfully declare that the newborn Christina was a boy. Eventually, her father, King Gustav, decreed that she should have a princely upbringing and become his successor to the throne.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

navyhistory:



Many people around the United States are following the ongoing crisis with Ebola. Here is an image from 1918 at the Philadelphia Naval Aircraft Factory concerning Spanish Influenza and its impact on the war effort. #factsnotfear

navyhistory:

Many people around the United States are following the ongoing crisis with Ebola. Here is an image from 1918 at the Philadelphia Naval Aircraft Factory concerning Spanish Influenza and its impact on the war effort. #factsnotfear
turnofthecentury:

A Female Reportage Photographer Surveys Berlin (c. 1910) Women in journalistic professions were a rarity in Wilhelmine Germany. Nonetheless, some women did succeed in establishing themselves as journalists – initially, they did so by working for the women’s newspapers and magazines that had been around since the middle of the nineteenth century; later on, they also worked for large newspapers. In this photograph (c. 1910), a female photographer surveys metropolitan Berlin from a crane being used in the construction of the Stadthaus [City Hall] on Molkenmarkt. The City Hall was built as an extension of the Rotes Rathaus [Red City Hall], whose large tower can be seen at the right. The Berliner Dom [Berlin Cathedral] can be seen in the background off to the left.  via GHDI

turnofthecentury:

A Female Reportage Photographer Surveys Berlin (c. 1910) Women in journalistic professions were a rarity in Wilhelmine Germany. Nonetheless, some women did succeed in establishing themselves as journalists – initially, they did so by working for the women’s newspapers and magazines that had been around since the middle of the nineteenth century; later on, they also worked for large newspapers. In this photograph (c. 1910), a female photographer surveys metropolitan Berlin from a crane being used in the construction of the Stadthaus [City Hall] on Molkenmarkt. The City Hall was built as an extension of the Rotes Rathaus [Red City Hall], whose large tower can be seen at the right. The Berliner Dom [Berlin Cathedral] can be seen in the background off to the left.
via GHDI

thegetty:

On October 16, 1793, the 38-year-old Marie-Antoinette met her end. An Austrian archduchess who became queen of France while still a teenager, she was subjected to a two-day mock trial and found guilty of conspiring with foreign powers against the French Republic.

It was widely believed that the queen had brought about the kingdom’s financial ruin in a time of economic crisis. Exhibit A: the Petit Trianon, a private country estate on the grounds of Versailles filled with glittering furniture and other decorative objets, which was cited as an example of her extravagance and debauchery.

“It is possible that the Petit Trianon cost immense sums,” she admitted to the Tribunal, “perhaps more than I would have wished. Little by little we were led into undertaking more expenses.”

More about these objects on The Getty Iris: Three Reasons to Love Marie-Antoinette

Queen Marie-Antoinette, about 1789, Pierre-Michel Alix after Elisabeth-Louise Vigée Le Brun. Courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington

Side Chair, 1780–81, Jacques Gondoin, designer; frames by François-Toussaint Foliot; carved by Toussaint Foliot. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Wall Light, 1781, model by Claude-Jean Pitoin, designer; casting and chasing attributed to Louis-Gabriel Feloix, metalworker. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Chair, about 1787, frame by Georges Jacob; carved by Pierre-Claude Triquet and Jean-Baptiste-Simon Rode. The J. Paul Getty Museum

In part two of our episode on Bela Lugosi, we talk about the later years of his life, when he simultaneously tried to distance himself from the role of Dracula, and took it on again and again to make ends meet.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

Happy Ada Lovelace Day! Here’s our episode on her from the archive.

Last year’s Halloween two-parter on Elsa Lanchester (the Bride of Frankenstein) worked out to be extremely popular, so this year we’re at it again: This time it’s two parts on Bela Lugosi. He’s mostly thought of in the context of his classic role as Dracula, but a number of historical events weave through his life, including World War I and the fall of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

archaeologicalnews:

image

A team of Greek researchers has confirmed that bones found in a two-chambered royal tomb at Vergina, a town some 100 miles away from Amphipolis mysterious burial mound, indeed belong to the Macedonian King Philip II, Alexander the Great’s father.

The anthropological investigation examined 350…

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

Better Babies Contests: Eugenics Goes to the Fair

…in the 1920s baby parades evolved into Better Babies Contests, marketed as public health initiatives. At these contests often held in rural fairgrounds, babies would be disrobed, measured, weighed and evaluated for temperament and intelligence. Winning babies might claim titles such as “Heaviest Boy Under 1 Year of Age.

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

Better Babies Contests: Eugenics Goes to the Fair

…in the 1920s baby parades evolved into Better Babies Contests, marketed as public health initiatives. At these contests often held in rural fairgrounds, babies would be disrobed, measured, weighed and evaluated for temperament and intelligence. Winning babies might claim titles such as “Heaviest Boy Under 1 Year of Age.

Today in 1871: the Great Chicago Fire. Our archival episode delves into the story that it was started by Mrs. O’Leary’s cow.

The Great Peshtigo Fire started on this day in 1871 as well. It’s in our archival episode History’s Unforgettable Fires.