Here’s a link to our whole series on China under Mao Zedong, all in one place.

Today’s episode concludes our four-part series on China under the rule of Chinese Communist Party Chairman Mao Zedong. It moves from where we left off last time (with most of Mao’s enemies, real and suspected, purged from the government) until his death and the Revolution’s aftermath. We also deal with some Western misconceptions of how the Revolution played out and how the CCP responded.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

My plan when starting our miniseries on China under Chinese Communist Party Chairman Mao Zedong was a three-parter: the Great Leap Forward, the Great Famine and the Cultural Revolution. Between announcing the miniseries and recording that third installment, though, the Cultural Revolution grew into a two-parter.

Today we’re talking about the Cultural Revolution’s first couple of years. This covers the heyday of the Red Guard, which was essentially an unsupervised army of teenagers empowered by Mao to seek out, expose, harass and imprison “rightists,” “bad elements” and others. It also covers a massive purge of Mao’s enemies (real and perceived) within the Chinese government.

Here is a link to our notes and research.

We get lots of questions from history majors asking for tips on careers in history. Since our degrees are in other fields, we’re often at a loss for an answer! We’re looking for stories and advice, which we may read on the air.

So, folks with history degrees: What do you do? How did you get to that point in your career?

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

When Little Boys Wore Dresses
"Before the middle of the eighteenth century, there really was no such thing as boys’ clothing, either in Europe or in its American colonies…"

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

When Little Boys Wore Dresses

"Before the middle of the eighteenth century, there really was no such thing as boys’ clothing, either in Europe or in its American colonies…"

Fritz Zwicky is often described as a genius, but also as a caustic figure. His insights into astrophysics are downright baffling, but his prickly interactions with peers were problematic to his career and his place in history.

Here’s a link to our notes and research.

medievalpoc:

European School, Peru
Portrait of King Tupac Yupanqui of the Inca
Spain; Peru (c. 1615)
Oil on Canvas, 60 x 55.2 cm.

Although indigenous people ranked below Spaniards in Spanish America’s social order, direct descendants of pre-Hispanic nobility were afforded certain political privileges, including the right to hold office in local government. In order to legitimize claims to noble lineage in the viceroyalty of Peru, members of the Inca elite often conspicuously displayed in their homes Europeanized portraits of their ancestors, the fourteen ancient Andean rulers.
Aunque los indígenas estaban por debajo de los españoles en el orden social de Hispanoamérica, a los descendientes directos de la nobleza prehispánica se les permitían ciertos privilegios políticos, incluyendo el derecho de tener cargos en el gobierno local. Para legitimar la atribución de linaje noble en el virreinato del Perú, miembros de la élite inca frecuentemente exhibían en sus casas retratos europeizados de sus ancestros, los catorce gobernantes andinos.

Brooklyn Museum

medievalpoc:

European School, Peru

Portrait of King Tupac Yupanqui of the Inca

Spain; Peru (c. 1615)

Oil on Canvas, 60 x 55.2 cm.

Although indigenous people ranked below Spaniards in Spanish America’s social order, direct descendants of pre-Hispanic nobility were afforded certain political privileges, including the right to hold office in local government. In order to legitimize claims to noble lineage in the viceroyalty of Peru, members of the Inca elite often conspicuously displayed in their homes Europeanized portraits of their ancestors, the fourteen ancient Andean rulers.

Aunque los indígenas estaban por debajo de los españoles en el orden social de Hispanoamérica, a los descendientes directos de la nobleza prehispánica se les permitían ciertos privilegios políticos, incluyendo el derecho de tener cargos en el gobierno local. Para legitimar la atribución de linaje noble en el virreinato del Perú, miembros de la élite inca frecuentemente exhibían en sus casas retratos europeizados de sus ancestros, los catorce gobernantes andinos.

Brooklyn Museum

Looks like we’ll need to update our 2009 episode (Franklin’s Lost Expedition).

congressarchives:

225th Anniversary of the First Congress: We’ll be posting documents and stories highlighting the establishment of the new government under the Constitution through March 2016.

On September 9, 1789, the Senate passed a resolution that included all of the Senate revisions to the House proposed amendments to the U.S. Constitution. The resolution was made from this document, often referred to as the Senate Mark-up of the Bill of Rights. 

This document captures the process of the Senate’s debate over the the House passed amendments to the Constitution from August 25 until September 9. The printed text represents the work done in the House as it hammered out the proposed amendments from July to August. The handwritten annotations describe the work done in the Senate. The mark-up illustrates how the Senate sharpened the language of the amendments, eliminated some articles, and combined clauses to reduce the seventeen House amendments to twelve. 

On September 25, Congress passed 12 amendments that were sent to the states for approval. Ten of the amendments were ratified by the required three-fourths of the states and became part of the Constitution in 1791. These first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution are known as the Bill of Rights.

Senate Revisions to the House Proposed Amendments to the U.S. Constitution, 9/1789, Records of the U.S. Senate

trappedinavelociraptor:

missedinhistory:

todayinhistory:

September 9th 1976: Chairman Mao dies

On this day in 1976, the Chinese Communist leader Mao Zedong died just after midnight at the age of 82. Born in 1893 into a Chinese farming family, the young Mao quickly developed an interest in Marxist and Communist ideology. After World War Two, a civil war broke out in China between the ruling nationalists led by Chiang Kai-shek and the communists he had tried to purge. Despite having the support of many Western nations like the United States, Chiang Kai-shek was defeated and Mao, who had led the communists, was victorious. On October 1st 1949 Mao proclaimed the founding of the People’s Republic of China. Mao then ruled the country as Chairman of the Communist Party, and under his rule any opposition to the communist regime was ruthlessly suppressed. Millions died under his rule, some from his disastrous policies like the ‘Great Leap Forward’ of 1958 which tried to rapidly transform China from an agrarian to industrial economy and triggered a deadly famine. Millions more died under his ruthless persecution, especially after the ‘Cultural Revolution’ of 1966 which aimed to purge counter-revolutionary forces in Chinese society. Overall Mao’s rule is believed to have caused the deaths of 40 to 70 million people. In his last years Mao worked to ease tensions with Western powers and met with US President Nixon in China in 1972. Mao Zedong died in 1976 following a period of deteriorating health; his body lay in state at the Great Hall of the People for ten days and his embalmed body remains on display in his mausoleum in Beijing.

(The anniversary of Chairman Mao’s death falling right in the middle of our China Under Chairman Mao series is a coincidence.)

That is amazingly unlikely, wow. Did you tie the podcast series to some holiday that might be tied to his death?

The only other option I can think of is that other history-focused sites started talking about him in the lead up to this, and seeing him come up prompted you to do this? I’m babbling and will stop now

Nope. One hundred percent coincidence. From Tracy: I’d had the Cultural Revolution on the to-do list since day one of being on the podcast, and a listener recently requested an episode on the Four Pests campaign, which was part of the Great Famine episode. Those two things grew into the miniseries, which we started recording two weeks after my books came in from interlibrary loan.

We also published our Orphan Trains episode during National Foster Care Month, which was also a total coincidence.